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GRAVY

  • My first novel started with a mole. Yes, a MOLE - a freckle, a birthmark, whatever you want to call it.
  • I was at the pool with my daughter getting ignored by our swim instructor when a lifeguard with a particularly ripped abdomen walked by. He stopped to flirt with one of the female lifeguards and my eyes flew directly to an adorable mole on the top can of his six-pack.
  • "How cute!" I thought (among other things). "He looks like a character in a romance novel!"
  • So I went home and started writing fiction for the first time. That was over a year ago and I still haven't been able to stop. GRAVY is the story of a suburban housewife who wants another baby, but gets a man with a mole instead.
  • GRAVY is now available on Kindle and Nook!

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« Questions, answered | Main | Endocrinologist Schmendocrinologist »

March 20, 2008

Comments

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Lia

That is the hardest part of Montessori everything is about CHOICE. If your kid isn't going to choose academics then forget it.

Glad to here you are good with your decision.

Velma

I totally agree. I toured a Montessori-based preschool, and could tell after the visit that it wasn't going to work for my rambunctious son. At his current (afternoon, school district, integrated special needs) pre-school, they arrive and head straight for the playground or gym, and then go inside for circle and center time, etc. - a much better fit for him!

heatherw

My kids were never in a Montessori setting, so I can't really speak to that, but my issue is with boys and how they learn. It seems like a lot of little boys are expected to sit quietly, listen, read (which is how most girls learn). My daughter performed fine under those expectations. My son, not so much. After reading "Raising Cain" (and saw the PBS documentary), I am convinced that boys can't be expected to learn in the same way girls learn. Just like you said: boys have to move and get the willies out. Girls do to, of course, but boys especially.

Rayne of Terror

Ah, the montessori preschool my son went to had outside time 2-3x per day as long as it was over 32 degrees. That worked great for my on-the-go son. They did a lot of their sensory activities outside on the grass too, so they could do the activity, run around, do more of the activity, run around, etc.

CP

I can't speak to the Montessori style as I knew that wouldn't work with your family expectations. I bet Alex would just thrive in a school like this one www.ucds.org, where my kids go/went.

Her Bad Mother

This was SO timely for me to read - a commenter sent me over, as I JUST wrote a post about trying to decide about Montessori. This helps A LOT.

Thank you.

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